The Ethics of COVID Vaccines

The Ethics of COVID Vaccines

Over the past several months, we’ve all heard a lot about the vaccines under development for COVID-19–and we’re all aware that fetal tissue, obtained from aborted babies, is often an important component of medical research and development.
So what do you need to know about the ethics behind the three vaccines that are close to release?
Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna/National Institutes of Health, and Astrazeneca/University of Oxford each released results from their phase 3 trials showing the vaccines to be at least 90 percent effective in preventing Covid-19.
But from a pro-life perspective, they are not created equal.
The pro-life Charlotte Lozier Institute, the National Catholic Bioethics Center, and the Catholic Health Association have all come to the conclusion that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are morally acceptable.
“Neither the Pfizer nor the Moderna vaccine involved the use of cell lines that originated in fetal tissue taken from the body of an aborted baby at any level of design, development, or production,” reads a memo from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops.
The Astrazeneca/Oxford vaccine is a different story, however. It uses a fetal cell line, derived from an abortion, in all four stages of development of the vaccine.
According to the Centers for Disease Control, the first supply of COVID vaccine will be available before the end of the year. Most adults should be able to be vaccinated in 2021.